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Irish Draft and Sport Horse Inspections 2018

Dear Irish Draught and Irish Sport Horse owner,

The Irish Draught Horse Society of Canada will be holding inspections this fall. If you would like to have your Irish Draught Horse or Irish Draught Sport Horse inspected this year in Canada, please send the below application to the inspections coordinator. If you have more than one horse, please copy the form as many times as you need providing the location of the horse as well as owner address for determining inspection sites.

The full application and payment is due by July 15. Applications submitted after July 15, 2018 must include a $75.00 late fee per horse. Inspections will be closed 30 days prior to the inspection. All paperwork must be complete and fees paid by that time. The number and location of the inspection sites will be determined based on paid applications postmarked no later than July 15, 2018.

The 2018 Inspection Fees for members are as follows):

$150 Geldings (at least 3 years ...

 

[Language English]Dressage

Dressage , from the French word for "training" is often described as the art of dancing on horseback or ballet on horseback and is often compared to the freestyle of figure skating.

 

LTED

“Long Term Equestrian Development”. Sounds fancy. But what does it have to do with you? You’re a typical rider, just thinking about dipping a toe into showing. Or maybe you’ve competed before, but your horse is green or young or not a $100,000 warmblood/sport horse/Olympian. Like every rider, you’re keen to improve your riding and learn new skills, but what does LTED have to do with you ? A lot! Please read on! Every person who picks up a pair of reins has taken her first step along the equestrian Pathway . This Pathway details the progression of a rider from his or her very first experience all the way to the Olympic podium. Each rider decides how far along the pathway s/he’ll travel, but the journey has been mapped out to ensure safe and successful learning. One of the components of the Pathway is the Long Term Equestrian Development program. Started nationwide in 2007, this program takes riders from their current lesson program and guides them ...

 

[Language English]Hunter/Jumper

The equestrian sport of jumping falls into two categories: show jumping and hunter.

Show jumping is one of the three Olympic equestrian disciplines. Horses are guided over a course of colourful obstacles that fall down if struck. The horse/rider combination are penalized for obstacles that have been knocked down or refused, for a foot in the water of a water obstacle, or for taking more than the time allowed to complete the course. Placings are determined by numerical score only.

In the hunter ring, the horse and rider complete a course of more natural-looking obstacles and are judge on the horse's paces and style over fences. The judges are looking for a safe, sound horse who would carry his rider in safety and elegance over obstacles while riding to hounds in the traditional sport of fox hunting.

Reining horses and riders complete intricate patterns using a set of barely perceptible cues. At reining competitions, horse and rider pairs are placed in classes sorted by their age, status (professional or amateur) and level of experience. At the top level of competition, competitors complete one of 10 patterns that demonstrate the athletic abilities of the horse and the subtle communication between horse and rider. Included in the patterns are several compulsory movements: varying circles, small slow circles, flying lead changes, roll backs, spins and the crowd pleasing sliding stop. Reining competitors also perform freestyles, in which they choreograph the compulsory movements to music. Freestyles are judged on level of difficulty as well as music and choreography.

Equestrian sport can represent an opportunity for freedom and movement to people with disabilities. It can also be a rejuvenating component in a therapeutic program. With various degrees of assistance and support, horse sport can be a reality for many people, whether a child with cerebral palsy or an adult with paralysis. People with disabilities can learn to ride a horse, compete alongside their peers and progress to high level competitions like the Paralympics or the World Equestrian Games. Challenges can be overcome and the experience is often rewarding.

 

 

Mission statement

The New Brunswick Equestrian Association is an umbrella organization for all equestrian activities and promotes horsemanship at all skill levels through education.

 

Benefits of Membership

New Brunswick Equestrian Association Membership... Everyone should have it... lesson students, barn staff, grooms, volunteers, parents... We all know that NBEA membership is "a must" for coaches, competitors, judges, etc. But why should the everyday rider, weekly lesson student, or parent be an NBEA member?

 

Insurance Program

A FEW FACTS ABOUT YOUR AUTOMATIC NBEA INSURANCE COVERAGE

IF YOU, THE MEMBER have paid your annual membership dues and are therefore in "good standing" with the NBEA, YOU, THE MEMBER are provided with TWO important and separate insurance benefits AUTOMATICALLY.

 

Driving

Driving is an all-encompassing equestrian sport, not only because all horse breeds and sizes can be used, but also because it appeals to people of all ages. There are four basic divisions: recreational driving, sanctioned competitions specifically for Pleasure Driving, Combined Driving and draft horses.

 

Endurance

Endurance riding – a non-Olympic FEI discipline – currently the fastest growing of the entire equestrian sports around the world, second only to Jumping in number of competitions.