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LTED

“Long Term Equestrian Development”. Sounds fancy. But what does it have to do with you? You’re a typical rider, just thinking about dipping a toe into showing. Or maybe you’ve competed before, but your horse is green or young or not a $100,000 warmblood/sport horse/Olympian. Like every rider, you’re keen to improve your riding and learn new skills, but what does LTED have to do with you ? A lot! Please read on! Every person who picks up a pair of reins has taken her first step along the equestrian Pathway . This Pathway details the progression of a rider from his or her very first experience all the way to the Olympic podium. Each rider decides how far along the pathway s/he’ll travel, but the journey has been mapped out to ensure safe and successful learning. One of the components of the Pathway is the Long Term Equestrian Development program. Started nationwide in 2007, this program takes riders from their current lesson program and guides them ...

 

[Language English]Eventing

Eventing is a sporting discipline which combines three phases of competition - dressage, cross country, and show jumping.

Each horse/rider combination performs a dressage test, demonstrating to the judges' the horse's paces, obedience, harmony with his rider, and degree of training. In the second phase, the horse and rider complete a course of solid-looking obstacles met on a course through fields, woods, and water, aiming to jump each obstacle without mishap within the time allowed. The final phase, show jumping, follows the same format as regular show jumping, proving that the horse is still fit and careful enough to negotiate a course of ore fragile obstacles without penalty. The scores from all three phases combine - the horse and rider with the fewest penalty points are the victors.

The Olympic and international format of Eventing spaces the phases out over three days. Shortened formats for lower level competitors, called Horse Trials or Derbies, can occur in one or two days.

 

Hunter/Jumper

The equestrian sport of jumping falls into two categories: show jumping and hunter.

Show jumping is one of the three Olympic equestrian disciplines. Horses are guided over a course of colourful obstacles that fall down if struck. The horse/rider combination are penalized for obstacles that have been knocked down or refused, for a foot in the water of a water obstacle, or for taking more than the time allowed to complete the course. Placings are determined by numerical score only.

In the hunter ring, the horse and rider complete a course of more natural-looking obstacles and are judge on the horse's paces and style over fences. The judges are looking for a safe, sound horse who would carry his rider in safety and elegance over obstacles while riding to hounds in the traditional sport of fox hunting.

[Language English] Pertinent News and Updates for Coaches Instructors Interested Candidates Preparation, Training, and Evaluation Events 2019 Coaching Certification Incentive Funding Equestrian Canada sport license requirements for Coaches/Instructors 2019

Have you heard? EC has implemented streamlined Sport Licence fees for 2019 . As part of this new structure, the minimum level of EC Sport Licence required for Certified Coaches and Instructors has been revised.

The revised requirements for Coaches and Instructors, which result in significantly decreased costs for those at the Instructor, Competition Coach and Coach Specialist levels, are as follows:

Important Reminders The $20 EC Coach Levy remains in effect for all active coaches and instructors. The changes to minimum Sport Licence requirements for coaches and instructors do not override the requirements for competitive athletes. If you plan to compete, you must maintain the Sport Licence appropriate to the level of competition you ...

 

Notice Regarding 2017 Equestrian Canada National Awards

Dear Equestrian Canada stakeholders, We would like to take this opportunity to provide you with an update regarding the 2017 EC National Awards program.