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Eventing

Eventing is a sporting discipline which combines three phases of competition - dressage, cross country, and show jumping.

Each horse/rider combination performs a dressage test, demonstrating to the judges' the horse's paces, obedience, harmony with his rider, and degree of training. In the second phase, the horse and rider complete a course of solid-looking obstacles met on a course through fields, woods, and water, aiming to jump each obstacle without mishap within the time allowed. The final phase, show jumping, follows the same format as regular show jumping, proving that the horse is still fit and careful enough to negotiate a course of ore fragile obstacles without penalty. The scores from all three phases combine - the horse and rider with the fewest penalty points are the victors.

The Olympic and international format of Eventing spaces the phases out over three days. Shortened formats for lower level competitors, called Horse Trials or Derbies, can occur in one or two days.

 

 

Horse Show Coaching Funding

A certified coach who registers in this program may apply to receive funding for traveling with a student or multiple students to a horse show or multiple horse shows for the purposes of coaching the student(s) in their classes.

 

Reining

Reining horses and riders complete intricate patterns using a set of barely perceptible cues. At reining competitions, horse and rider pairs are placed in classes sorted by their age, status (professional or amateur) and level of experience. At the top level of competition, competitors complete one of 10 patterns that demonstrate the athletic abilities of the horse and the subtle communication between horse and rider. Included in the patterns are several compulsory movements: varying circles, small slow circles, flying lead changes, roll backs, spins and the crowd pleasing sliding stop. Reining competitors also perform freestyles, in which they choreograph the compulsory movements to music. Freestyles are judged on level of difficulty as well as music and choreography.

NBEA Youth Bursary 2018 This year, the NBEA had a record number of young riders apply for one of six $500 bursaries to help them further their equestrian education. After careful deliberation, the bursary committee has chosen the following recipients for this year. Congratulations!

Chelsea Cooke

Chelsea is a 15 year old equestrian that lives in New Maryland, N.B.. She has her Level 4 Riding and would like to put the bursary towards her level 5 and Beginner Coaching. Chelsea is interested in training her young OTTB and taking him to a few shows this summer. She is often found helping whenever she can at Les Ecuries de la Cadence Stables and is known for being hard working and dedicated to the sport.

Hannah Perkins

At 14, Hannah aspires to be a professional trainer. She is involved in many clubs in N.B. including MQHA, MQHVA, NBEA & AQHA. She is currently secretary of the MQHVA and dedicates considerably time to these clubs. Hannah rides at Yellow Rose Stables in Glenvale ...

 

LTED

[Language English]

“Long Term Equestrian Development”. Sounds fancy. But what does it have to do with you? You’re a typical rider, just thinking about dipping a toe into showing. Or maybe you’ve competed before, but your horse is green or young or not a $100,000 warmblood/sport horse/Olympian. Like every rider, you’re keen to improve your riding and learn new skills, but what does LTED have to do with you ? A lot! Please read on! Every person who picks up a pair of reins has taken her first step along the equestrian Pathway. This Pathway details the progression of a rider from his or her very first experience all the way to the Olympic podium. Each rider decides how far along the pathway s/he’ll travel, but the journey has been mapped out to ensure safe and successful learning. One of the segments of the Pathway is the Long Term Equestrian Development program. Started nationwide in 2007, this program takes riders from their current lesson program and guides them ...

 

[Language English]Endurance

Endurance riding – a non-Olympic FEI discipline – currently the fastest growing of the entire equestrian sports around the world, second only to Jumping in number of competitions.

 

 

Driving

Driving is an all-encompassing equestrian sport, not only because all horse breeds and sizes can be used, but also because it appeals to people of all ages. There are four basic divisions: recreational driving, sanctioned competitions specifically for Pleasure Driving, Combined Driving and draft horses.

 

Dressage

Dressage , from the French word for "training" is often described as the art of dancing on horseback or ballet on horseback and is often compared to the freestyle of figure skating.

 

 

EC-Rules

Equestrian Canada Rules